Endometriosis and Biotin

As we mentioned in previous articles, endometriosis growing somewhere else other than the endometrium also reacts to hormonal signals of the monthly menstrual cycle by building up tissue, breaking it, and eliminating it through the menstrual period. As we know, nutritional supplements play a very important role in treating all kind of diseases. In this article, we will discuss how biotin helps to treat endometriosis.

I. Definition

Biotin is one of the members of the vitamin B complex. It is also known as vitamin H or B7. Vitamin B7 is a co-factor in the metabolism of fatty acids, leucine, and in gluconeogenesis. It has a chemical structure formula of C10H16N2O3S. Deficiency is extremely rare, as intestinal bacteria generally produce an excess of the body’s daily requirement but for what ever reason, women with endometriosis are found to have low levels of biotin.

II. How biotin helps in treating endometriosis

1. Cell abnormality

Biotin acts as a co-factor with the other members in the vitamin B complex. It plays an important role in managing the body’s cell growth. Without enough biotin, it causes cell growth abnormality such as the forming of perinatal cells into endometrial cell in the abdominal regions.

2. Poor blood circulation

Since biotin helps in gluconeogenesis, it regulates the sugar levels in the blood stream. Without enough levels of biotin, the level of blood sugar rises causing the thickening of blood which reduces the circulatory function and blocks the transportation of nutrients and oxygen to our body’s cells. This results in an increased risk of symptoms of endometriosis.

3. Endometrial cramps

Since biotin is necessary in the metabolism of fatty acids, it helps to maintain levels of prostaglandins. Deficiency of biotin causes some members in the prostaglandins family to be over-produced during the menstrual cycle leading to menstrual and endometrial cramps.

4. Respiratory problem

Since biotin helps to synthesize carbon dioxide, without enough biotin it causes shortness of breath in women with endometriosis.

5. Risk of heart disease and stroke

If the liver cannot produce enough bile to generate good cholesterol because of not enough amounts of biotin in the body, it leads to cholesterol building up in the arteries causing the thickening of the arterial wall and the blockage o circulation of blood resulting in an increased risk of heart disease and stroke.

6. Weaken function of nervous system

Since biotin acts as a co-factor with other vitamin B complexes in the metabolism of protein, deficiency of biotin interferes with that process. It weakens the normal functions of cells in the nervous system leading to tension of the nervous system such as anxiety, dizziness, loss of memory, and depression.



Source by Kyle J Norton

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